Mammal invaders on islands: impact, control and control impact

@article{Courchamp2003MammalIO,
  title={Mammal invaders on islands: impact, control and control impact},
  author={Franck Courchamp and Jean Louis Chapuis and Michel Pascal},
  journal={Biological Reviews},
  year={2003},
  volume={78}
}
The invasion of ecosystems by exotic species is currently viewed as one of the most important sources of biodiversity loss. The largest part of this loss occurs on islands, where indigenous species have often evolved in the absence of strong competition, herbivory, parasitism or predation. As a result, introduced species thrive in those optimal insular ecosystems affecting their plant food, competitors or animal prey. As islands are characterised by a high rate of endemism, the impacted… Expand
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