Males Respond to the Risk of Sperm Competition in the Sexually Cannibalistic Praying Mantis, Mantis religiosa

@article{Prokop2005MalesRT,
  title={Males Respond to the Risk of Sperm Competition in the Sexually Cannibalistic Praying Mantis, Mantis religiosa},
  author={Pavol Prokop and Radovan V{\'a}clav},
  journal={Ethology},
  year={2005},
  volume={111},
  pages={836-848}
}
Although studies on sperm competition examined a wide range of taxa, little is known about the selection pressures on male traits in systems with simultaneous risk of sperm competition and sexual cannibalism. Here, we experimentally studied how the risk of sperm competition affects male copulatory behavior in the sexually cannibalistic praying mantis Mantis religiosa. We recorded the onset and duration of copulations following the introduction of virgin, adult praying mantises into mating… 

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