Male strategies and Plio-Pleistocene archaeology.

@article{Oconnell2002MaleSA,
  title={Male strategies and Plio-Pleistocene archaeology.},
  author={James F. O'connell and Kristen Hawkes and Karen D. Lupo and Nicholas G. Blurton Jones},
  journal={Journal of human evolution},
  year={2002},
  volume={43 6},
  pages={
          831-72
        }
}
Archaeological data are frequently cited in support of the idea that big game hunting drove the evolution of early Homo, mainly through its role in offspring provisioning. This argument has been disputed on two grounds: (1) ethnographic observations on modern foragers show that although hunting may contribute a large fraction of the overall diet, it is an unreliable day-to-day food source, pursued more for status than subsistence; (2) archaeological evidence from the Plio-Pleistocene… 

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