Male sterility at extreme temperatures: a significant but neglected phenomenon for understanding Drosophila climatic adaptations

@article{David2005MaleSA,
  title={Male sterility at extreme temperatures: a significant but neglected phenomenon for understanding Drosophila climatic adaptations},
  author={J. David and L. Araripe and M. Chakir and H. Legout and B. Lemos and G. P{\'e}tavy and C. Rohmer and D. Joly and B. Mor{\'e}teau},
  journal={Journal of Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2005},
  volume={18}
}
The thermal range for viability is quite variable among Drosophila species and it has long been known that these variations are correlated with geographic distribution: temperate species are on average more cold tolerant but more heat sensitive than tropical species. At both ends of their viability range, sterile males have been observed in all species investigated so far. This symmetrical phenomenon restricts the temperature limits within which permanent cultures can be kept in the laboratory… Expand
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