Male sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) acoustics in a high-latitude habitat: implications for echolocation and communication

@article{Madsen2002MaleSW,
  title={Male sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) acoustics in a high-latitude habitat: implications for echolocation and communication},
  author={Peter Teglberg Madsen and Magnus Wahlberg and Bertel M{\o}hl},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2002},
  volume={53},
  pages={31-41}
}
Abstract. Sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) are deep-diving predators foraging in meso- and bathypelagic ecosystems off the continental shelves. To investigate the ecophysiological and communicative function of various click types from male sperm whales in a high-latitude habitat, we deployed a large-aperture array of calibrated hydrophones off northern Norway (N69, E15). Data show that sperm whales in this habitat produce three click types: usual clicks, creak clicks and, occasionally… 
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SEASONAL OCCURRENCE OF SPERM WHALE (PHYSETER MACROCEPHALUS) SOUNDS IN THE GULF OF ALASKA, 1999–2001
An acoustic survey for sperm whales was conducted in the Gulf of Alaska. Six autonomous hydrophones continuously recorded sound signals below 500 Hz from October 1999 to May 2001. After recovery,
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