Male size determines reproductive output in a paternal mouthbrooding fish

@article{Kolm2002MaleSD,
  title={Male size determines reproductive output in a paternal mouthbrooding fish},
  author={Niclas Kolm},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2002},
  volume={63},
  pages={727-733}
}
  • N. Kolm
  • Published 2002
  • Biology
  • Animal Behaviour
Size can have strong effects on reproductive success in both males and females, and in many species large individuals are preferred as mates. To estimate the potential benefits from mate choice for size in both sexes, I studied the effects of the size of each sex on the reproductive output of pairs of Banggai cardinalfish, Pterapogon kauderni, a sexually monomorphic obligate paternal mouthbrooder. When pairs were allowed to form freely, a size-assortative mating pattern was observed and larger… Expand
Females produce larger eggs for large males in a paternal mouthbrooding fish
  • N. Kolm
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 2001
TLDR
Experiments show that females in this species adjust their offspring weight and, thus, presumably offspring quality according to the size of their mate, and suggest a female preference for larger males. Expand
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Differential investment in the Banggai cardinalfish: can females adjust egg size close to egg maturation to match the attractiveness of a new partner?
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  • Biology
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  • 2003
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TLDR
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TLDR
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