Male ornamental coloration improves courtship success in a jumping spider, but only in the sun

@article{Taylor2013MaleOC,
  title={Male ornamental coloration improves courtship success in a jumping spider, but only in the sun},
  author={Lisa A. Taylor and Kevin J. McGraw},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology},
  year={2013},
  volume={24},
  pages={955-967}
}
In many animals, males display colorful ornaments to females during courtship, the effectiveness of which depends on the ambient lighting environment. While a variety of hypotheses exist to explain both presence of and variation in such traits, many propose that they function as signals and that their presence is required for or improves successful mating. In Habronattus pyrrithrix jumping spiders, males display brilliant, condition-dependent red faces and green legs to drab gray/brown females… 

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