Male mating tactics and lethal combat in the nonpollinating fig wasp Sycoscapter australis

@article{Bean2001MaleMT,
  title={Male mating tactics and lethal combat in the nonpollinating fig wasp Sycoscapter australis
},
  author={Daniel W. Bean and James M. Cook},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2001},
  volume={62},
  pages={535-542}
}
Abstract Fatal fights are rare in the majority of animal species but are a common component of mate competition between wingless males of some species of fig-associated wasps. We investigated fatal fighting in Sycoscapter australis, a nonpollinating fig wasp found in the syconia (inflorescences) of the Moreton Bay fig, Ficus macrophylla. Overall, about 25% of males sustained fatal injuries during the mate competition period. Measurement and analysis of 349 males revealed a sevenfold difference… Expand
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