Male house mice that have evolved with sperm competition have increased mating duration and paternity success

@article{Klemme2013MaleHM,
  title={Male house mice that have evolved with sperm competition have increased mating duration and paternity success},
  author={I. Klemme and R. C. Firman},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2013},
  volume={85},
  pages={751-758}
}
Sperm competition imposes strong selection on males to gain fertilizations and maximize paternity. Males have been shown to adapt to sperm competition by modifying their behaviour and/or reproductive physiology. We investigated the fitness effects of male responses to sperm competition in house mice, Mus domesticus. Males that had been evolving with (polygamy) and without (monogamy) sperm competition for 18 generations were subject to different frequencies of social encounters with conspecific… Expand

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