Male fruit f lies learn to avoid interspecific courtship

@inproceedings{Behavior2004MaleFF,
  title={Male fruit f lies learn to avoid interspecific courtship},
  author={Animal Behavior},
  year={2004}
}
  • Animal Behavior
  • Published 2004
Experimental data suggest, and theoretical models typically assume, that males of many fruit flies (Drosophila spp) are at least partially indiscriminate while searching for mates, and that it is mostly the females who exert selective mate choice, which can lead to incipient speciation. Evidence on learning by male D. melanogaster in the context of courtship, however, raises the possibility that the initially indiscriminate males become more selective with experience. I tested this possibility… CONTINUE READING

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