Male dominance and genetically determined reproductive success in the mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx)

@article{Dixson2006MaleDA,
  title={Male dominance and genetically determined reproductive success in the mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx)},
  author={Alan F. Dixson and Thierry Bossi and E. Jean Wickings},
  journal={Primates},
  year={2006},
  volume={34},
  pages={525-532}
}
Darwin referred to the adult male mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx) as the most brightly coloured of all mammals, citing the brilliant red and blue pigmentation of the face, rump, and genitalia as extreme examples of evolution by sexual selection. Considerable controversy exists concerning possible effects of sexually selected phenotypes via intermale competition on reproductive success. Behavioural and genetic studies of a large, semi-free ranging mandrill colony in Gabon have now demonstrated that… Expand

Figures and Tables from this paper

OFFSPRING PROTECTION BY MALE MANDRILLS, MANDRILLUS SPHINX
TLDR
Observations suggesting the existence of male parental care in the mandrill are reported, one of the most sexually dimorphic mammal species known and a species in which, in the wild, males reside in social groups solely for the breeding season. Expand
Sexual Selection and the differences between the sexes in Mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx).
  • J. Setchell
  • Biology, Medicine
  • American journal of physical anthropology
  • 2016
TLDR
This review shows how different reproductive priorities lead to very different life histories and divergent adaptations in males and females and demonstrates how broadening traditional perspectives on sexual selection beyond the ostentatious results of intense sexual selection on males leads to an understanding of more subtle and cryptic forms of competition and choice in both sexes. Expand
Constraints on control: factors influencing reproductive success in male mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx)
TLDR
This study is, to its knowledge, one of the first in primates to use an integrative approach and multivariate analysis to show that multiple factors are involved in determining the probability of paternity by dominant males. Expand
OFFSPRING PROTECTION BY MALE MANDRILLS , MANDRILLUS
Most mammals are characterized by a lack of parental care by the male sex. This is particularly true in highly polygynous, sexually selected species and species in which fathers remain only weaklyExpand
Reproductive Parameters and Maternal Investment in Mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx)
TLDR
Maternal rank and parity appear to influence reproductive success in female mandrills in Gabon, but there is no apparent differential maternal investment by sex. Expand
Dominance, Coloration, and Social and Sexual Behavior in Male Drills Mandrillus leucophaeus
TLDR
It was found that male coloration did indicate rank, and that high ranking, strongly colored males were more likely to associate with adult females, and more specifically with fully tumescent females, which indicated that these males also engaged in more sexual activity. Expand
Do Female Mandrills Prefer Brightly Colored Males?
  • J. Setchell
  • Biology
  • International Journal of Primatology
  • 2005
TLDR
An unusual case wherein the alpha male fell in rank without loss of coloration is reported, in further support of the hypothesis that females show mate choice for brightly colored males, independent of dominance rank. Expand
The Mandrill: A Case of Extreme Sexual Selection
TLDR
Bringing to life, through detailed descriptions and rich illustrations, the mandrill’s communicatory biology and the functions of its brightly coloured adornments, this book sheds new light on the evolutionary biology of this fascinating primate. Expand
Male competition and its hormonal correlates in Assamese macaques (Macaca assamensis)
TLDR
Mechanisms of male reproductive competition and its hormonal basis in a cercopithecine species with reduced contest potential owing to female reproductive synchrony and concealed ovulation are investigated. Expand
Sexual swelling in mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx): a test of the reliable indicator hypothesis
TLDR
It is concluded that the reliable indicator hypothesis does not explain variation in sexual swellings in female mandrills. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 27 REFERENCES
Male-male Competition and Reproductive Success in Elephant Seals
Male-male competition and reproductive success of northern elephant seals, Mirounga augustirostris , was studied for six consecutive breeding seasons at Ano Nuevo Island, California. The conclusionsExpand
Development from birth to sexual maturity in a semi-free-ranging colony of mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) in Gabon.
TLDR
Marked individual age differences occurred with regard to the onset and complete development of these features, suggesting possible interactions between social environment and physical maturation in mandrills in Gabon. Expand
A new interpretation of the social organization and mating system of the Callitrichidae
TLDR
It is proposed that the Callitrichidae tend to live in small multimalemultifemale groups, communally rear the young of one female, and exhibit a mating pattern characterized by female promiscuity but a breeding system that is functionally polyandrous. Expand
Facultative polyandry and the role of infant-carrying in wild saddle-back tamarins (Saguinus fuscicollis)
  • A. Goldizen
  • Biology
  • Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
  • 2004
TLDR
The data from this study population tentatively support the hypothesis that adults should mate monogramously only if they have nonreproductive helpers to help rear infants, and the proposed benefits of polyandry to males and females differ quantitatively, but in both cases benefits stem from the help that males provide in rearing young. Expand
Preliminary report on the grouping of mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) in Cameroon
A field study of mandrill was carried out from 1979 to 1983 in Cameroon for 27 months. Group size of mandrills ranged from 15 to 95 and composition was estimated by direct and indirect observations.Expand
Male rank and reproductive activity in Savanna baboons
TLDR
It is concluded that male rank is an unreliable predictor of male reproductive activity among adult male baboons. Expand
Dominance, aggression and reproduction in primate societies.
  • I. Bernstein
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of theoretical biology
  • 1976
TLDR
It was hypothesized that increased genetic fitness related to the increased survival of immature animals in the troop, most of which would already be the offspring of senior (and hence alpha) males, would be for the social skills leading to successful alliances in troop defense. Expand
STRUCTURE OF GELADA BABOON REPRODUCTIVE UNITS I. STABILITY OF SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS
TLDR
Analysis of the structure of social relationships among the members of the unit shows that almost all social interactions by adults are with individuals in their own units, and this stability is probably due to a strong tendency for females to interact preferentially with their female kin. Expand
Male age, dominance, and mating success among rhesus macaques.
  • C. Mcmillan
  • Biology, Medicine
  • American journal of physical anthropology
  • 1989
TLDR
Data from a study of rhesus monkeys on Cayo Santiago showed that subadult males mated significantly less than adults, and young, fully adult males have the best chance of fathering offspring regardless of their dominance rank. Expand
The study of vocal communication of wild mandrills in Cameroon in relation to their social structure
TLDR
The vocal repertoire of the mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx), a forest living baboon, is described, and their vocal communication analyzed quantitatively, suggesting the social structure of mandrills is suggested to be multi-male rather than a multilevelled type. Expand
...
1
2
3
...