Male common loons, Gavia immer, communicate body mass and condition through dominant frequencies of territorial yodels

@article{Mager2007MaleCL,
  title={Male common loons, Gavia immer, communicate body mass and condition through dominant frequencies of territorial yodels},
  author={John N. Mager and Charles Walcott and Walter Piper},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2007},
  volume={73},
  pages={683-690}
}
We investigated whether male-specific territorial ‘yodels’ communicate information about individual size and condition in the common loon. Individuals in better condition and of larger body mass, but not larger structural body size, produced lower-frequency yodels, and changes in dominant frequencies of yodels between years reflected changes in male body mass and condition. An acoustic playback experiment indicated that potential receivers vocalized sooner and more often in response to low… Expand

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