Male bonnet macaques use information about third-party rank relationships to recruit allies

@article{Silk1999MaleBM,
  title={Male bonnet macaques use information about third-party rank relationships to recruit allies},
  author={Joan B. Silk},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1999},
  volume={58},
  pages={45-51}
}
Social challenges may have driven the evolution of intelligence in primates and other taxa. In primates, the social intelligence hypothesis is supported by evidence that primates know a lot about their own relationships to others and also know something about the nature of relationships among other individuals (third-party relationships). Knowledge of third-party relationships is likely to play an especially important role in coalitions, which occur when one individual intervenes in an ongoing… CONTINUE READING

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