Corpus ID: 83980956

Male behaviour and correlates of mating success in a natural population of African Painted Reed frogs (Hyperolius marmoratus)

@article{Dyson1992MaleBA,
  title={Male behaviour and correlates of mating success in a natural population of African Painted Reed frogs (Hyperolius marmoratus)},
  author={M. Dyson and N. Passmore and P. J. Bishop and S. P. Henzi},
  journal={Herpetologica},
  year={1992},
  volume={48},
  pages={236-246}
}
We studied the behavior and mating success of a natural population of painted reed frogs, Hyperolius marmoratus, over 28 consecutive nights at the height of the breeding season. The operational sex ratio (OSR) was strongly biased towards males on every night. Larger choruses were characterized by a greater absolute number of females than small choruses. However, no relationship was found between chorus size and the OSR. Males showed a high degree of site fidelity both within and between nights… Expand
Calling behaviour influences mating success in male painted reed frogs, Hyperolius marmoratus
TLDR
A detailed study was made of the natural calling behaviour of male painted reed frogs in the wild, with few exceptions, the period over which males called either spanned or extended beyond the time window when females sought mates in the chorus. Expand
Sexual selection in the lek-breeding European treefrog: body size, chorus attendance, random mating and good genes
TLDR
It is suggested that a similar mating pattern is found in many lek-breeding hylid frogs in which male mating success is mainly determined by chorus attendance, and females that mate randomly are likely to mate with high-quality males and thereby gain indirect genetic benefits without incurring costs of extended mate searching and mate assessment. Expand
Breeding behaviour and mating success of Phyllomedusa rohdei (Anura, Hylidae) in south‐eastern Brazil
Observations on the courtship behaviour, mating behaviour and mating success of a leaf‐frog, Phyllomedusa rohdei, population were conducted in a temporary flooded site of the Atlantic Forest,Expand
Success breeds success in mating male reed frogs (Hyperolius marmoratus)
TLDR
It is shown that individual males who mate on a given night enjoy a higher probability of being successful on the next night, and it is suggested that this is because successful mating enables males to conserve energy. Expand
Breeding Activity of the Neotropical Treefrog Hyla elegans (Anura, Hylidae)
TLDR
A positive correlation between the numbers of females and males in the chorus was found, but no significant correlation between OSR (number of reproducing females/number of reproduced males) and the number of males present was found. Expand
Consistency of calling performance in male Hyperolius marmoratus marmoratus: implications for male mating success
TLDR
It is proposed that intermittent calling behaviour allows a male to extend chorus attendance when levels of male-male competition are low, and has important implications for male mating success. Expand
Costs and benefits of mate choice in the lek-breeding reed frog, Hyperolius marmoratus
TLDR
This work investigated two potential direct benefits that females gain from being choosy in the lek-breeding painted reed frog, Hyperolius marmoratus broadleyi: assurance of fertilization and reduction in search costs. Expand
Repeatability of mate choice: the effect of size in the African painted reed frog, Hyperolius marmoratus
TLDR
Female painted reed frogs were offered a choice between artificial advertisement calls differing in frequency, and there was a relationship between female size and the number of times they chose the lower frequency stimuli. Expand
CHORUS ORGANIZATION OF THE LEAF-FROG PHYLLOMEDUSA ROHDEI ( ANURA , HYLIDAE )
We studied the chorus organization of a population of prolonged-breeding Phyllomedusa rohdei at a temporary pond in Saquarema, State of Rio de Janeiro, south-eastern Brazil. Males, females andExpand
CHORUS ORGANIZATION OF THE LEAF-FROG PHYLLOMEDUSA ROHDEI (ANURA, HYLIDAE)
We studied the chorus organization of a population of prolonged-breeding Phyllomedusa rohdei at a temporary pond in Saquarema, State of Rio de Janeiro, south-eastern Brazil. Males, females andExpand
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