Male and Female Jealousy, Still More Similar than Different: Reply to Sagarin (2005)

@article{Harris2005MaleAF,
  title={Male and Female Jealousy, Still More Similar than Different: Reply to Sagarin (2005)},
  author={Christine R. Harris},
  journal={Personality and Social Psychology Review},
  year={2005},
  volume={9},
  pages={76 - 86}
}
  • C. Harris
  • Published 1 February 2005
  • Biology
  • Personality and Social Psychology Review
Harris (2003b), reviewing evidence for the Jealousy as a Specific Innate Module (JSIM) theory, concluded that overall there is no support for innate sex differences in jealousy over sexual and emotional infidelity This article responds to Sagarin's challenges (this issue) by showing (a) JSIM proponents have not advocated Sagarin's attenuated version of JSIM; (b) studies using continuous measures do not support the original JSIM (the majorityfind no significant effects, and the effects that… 

Figures and Tables from this paper

There’s Jealousy…and Then There’s Jealousy: Differential Effects of Jealousy on Testosterone
Jealousy evokes strong psychological responses, but little is known about physiological effects. This study investigated whether actively thinking about a jealousy-provoking situation would result in
Sex differences in jealousy: The case of Internet infidelity
Studies investigating the events that elicit men’s and women’s jealousy consistently show that men’s jealousy, more than women’s jealousy, is triggered by a mate’s sexual infidelity, and women’s
Gender, socioeconomic status, age, and jealousy: emotional responses to infidelity in a national sample.
TLDR
Testing the evolutionary hypothesis that men would be more bothered by sexual infidelity and women by emotional infidelity, the Jealousy as a Specific Innate Module (JSIM) effect, suggested that there are distinct emotional components of jealousy that did not evolve differently by gender.
Mapping the Conceptual Space of Jealousy
Evolutionary approaches to the study of romantic jealousy have principally been guided by the idea that there are two types of threats to romantic relationships—sexual and emotional—and that these
Evidence for conditional sex differences in emotional but not in sexual jealousy at the automatic level of cognitive processing
The two evolutionary psychological hypotheses that men react more jealous than women to sexual infidelity and women react more jealous than men to emotional infidelity are currently controversial
Sex Differences in Jealousy: An Evolutionary Perspective on Online Infidelity
This study examined whether sex differences in jealousy would generalize to online infidelity. Based on the evolutionary psychological explanation for sex differences in jealousy (ancestral men's
Jealousy: Analytic behavioral interpretation
Analysis and considerations on jealousy supported by Behavior Analysis have been made by some authors, including Skinner. However, it is noticed that the scientific production on this topic under the
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 52 REFERENCES
Reconsidering Evolved Sex Differences in Jealousy: Comment on Harris (2003)
  • Brad J. Sagarin
  • Psychology
    Personality and social psychology review : an official journal of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc
  • 2005
TLDR
An integrative model that describes how jealousy might result from the interaction of sociocultural variables and evolved sex differences and suggestions for future research directions are discussed.
Sex differences in jealousy: evolutionary mechanism or artifact of measurement?
TLDR
Findings suggest that the sex difference used to support the evolutionary view of jealousy likely represents a measurement artifact resulting from a format-induced effortful decision strategy and not an automatic, sex-specific response shaped by evolution.
Evolutionary Origins of Sex Differences in Jealousy? Questioning the “Fitness” of the Model
Evolutionary psychology has become a popular framework for studying jealousy Much of this popularity can be attributed to work by Buss and his colleagues showing an apparent relation between an
A Review of Sex Differences in Sexual Jealousy, Including Self-Report Data, Psychophysiological Responses, Interpersonal Violence, and Morbid Jealousy
  • C. Harris
  • Psychology
    Personality and social psychology review : an official journal of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc
  • 2003
TLDR
This article finds only one hypothetical measure consistent with the specific innate modular theory of jealousy, which is contradicted by a variety of other measures, and discusses the findings from a social-cognitive theoretical perspective.
Gender, Jealousy, and Reason
Research has suggested that men are especially bothered by evidence of their partner's sexual infidelity, whereas women are troubled more by evidence of emotional infidelity One evolutionary account
Gender, socioeconomic status, age, and jealousy: emotional responses to infidelity in a national sample.
TLDR
Testing the evolutionary hypothesis that men would be more bothered by sexual infidelity and women by emotional infidelity, the Jealousy as a Specific Innate Module (JSIM) effect, suggested that there are distinct emotional components of jealousy that did not evolve differently by gender.
...
...