Male Weaponry in a Fighting Cricket

@article{Judge2008MaleWI,
  title={Male Weaponry in a Fighting Cricket},
  author={K. A. Judge and V. Bonanno},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2008},
  volume={3}
}
Sexually selected male weaponry is widespread in nature. Despite being model systems for the study of male aggression in Western science and for cricket fights in Chinese culture, field crickets (Orthoptera, Gryllidae, Gryllinae) are not known to possess sexually dimorphic weaponry. In a wild population of the fall field cricket, Gryllus pennsylvanicus, we report sexual dimorphism in head size as well as the size of mouthparts, both of which are used when aggressive contests between males… Expand

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