Male Migration in Barbary Macaques (Macaca sylvanus) at Affenberg Salem

@article{Kuester2004MaleMI,
  title={Male Migration in Barbary Macaques (Macaca sylvanus) at Affenberg Salem},
  author={Jutta Kuester and Andreas Paul},
  journal={International Journal of Primatology},
  year={2004},
  volume={20},
  pages={85-106}
}
  • J. Kuester, A. Paul
  • Published 1 February 1999
  • Biology
  • International Journal of Primatology
We analyzed male migration during a 20-year period in the free-ranging Barbary macaque population of Affenberg Salem. Most natal migrations occurred around puberty, but only one third of all males left the natal group. Secondary group transfers were rare. All males immediately transferred to other bisexual groups. Migration rates were highest during periods with high adult female/male ratios within social groups. Immigrants highly preferred groups with fewer males of their own age than in the… Expand

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