Male-Killing Bacteria Trigger a Cycle of Increasing Male Fatigue and Female Promiscuity

@article{Charlat2007MaleKillingBT,
  title={Male-Killing Bacteria Trigger a Cycle of Increasing Male Fatigue and Female Promiscuity},
  author={Sylvain Charlat and Max Reuter and Emily A. Dyson and Emily A. Hornett and Anne Duplouy and Neil Davies and George K. Roderick and Nina Wedell and Gregory D. D. Hurst},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2007},
  volume={17},
  pages={273-277}
}
Sex-ratio distorters are found in numerous species and can reach high frequencies within populations. Here, we address the compelling, but poorly tested, hypothesis that the sex ratio bias caused by such elements profoundly alters their host's mating system. We compare aspects of female and male reproductive biology between island populations of the butterfly Hypolimnas bolina that show varying degrees of female bias, because of a male-killing Wolbachia infection. Contrary to expectation… Expand
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