Male Impersonation in the Music Hall: the Case of Vesta Tilley

@article{Aston1988MaleII,
  title={Male Impersonation in the Music Hall: the Case of Vesta Tilley},
  author={Elaine Aston},
  journal={New Theatre Quarterly},
  year={1988},
  volume={4},
  pages={247-257}
}
  • Elaine Aston
  • Published 1 August 1988
  • History
  • New Theatre Quarterly
Music hall has only recently been treated to ‘serious’ as distinct from anecdotal study, and the ‘turns’ of its leading performers remain largely unexplored. Particularly revealing, perhaps, are the acts of the male impersonators – whose ancestry in ‘legit’ performance had been a long one, yet whose particular approach to cross-dressing had a special social and sexual significance during the ascendancy of music hall, with its curious mixture of working-class directness, commercial knowingness… 
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Titterton, From Theatre to Music Hall, describing Vesta Tilley as 'Burlington Bertie', quoted by David Cheshire in Music Hall in Britain
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