Male–male aggression peaks at intermediate relatedness in a social spider mite

@article{Sato2013MalemaleAP,
  title={Male–male aggression peaks at intermediate relatedness in a social spider mite},
  author={Yukie Sato and M. Egas and M. Sabelis and A. Mochizuki},
  journal={Ecology and Evolution},
  year={2013},
  volume={3},
  pages={2661 - 2669}
}
Abstract Theory predicts that when individuals live in groups or colonies, male–male aggression peaks at intermediate levels of local average relatedness. Assuming that aggression is costly and directed toward nonrelatives and that competition for reproduction acts within the colony, benefits of aggressive behavior are maximized in colonies with a mix of related and unrelated competitors because aggression hurts nonkin often, thereby favoring reproduction of kin. This leads to a dome-shaped… Expand
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