Malarial parasites decrease reproductive success: an experimental study in a passerine bird

@article{Marzal2004MalarialPD,
  title={Malarial parasites decrease reproductive success: an experimental study in a passerine bird},
  author={Alfonso Marzal and Florentino de Lope and Carlos Navarro and Anders Pape M{\o}ller},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2004},
  volume={142},
  pages={541-545}
}
Malarial parasites are supposed to have strong negative fitness consequences for their hosts, but relatively little evidence supports this claim due to the difficulty of experimentally testing this. We experimentally reduced levels of infection with the blood parasite Haemoproteus prognei in its host the house martin Delichon urbica, by randomly treating adults with primaquine or a control treatment. Treated birds had significantly fewer parasites than controls. The primaquine treatment… Expand

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