Malarial Subjects: Empire, Medicine and Nonhumans in British India, 1820–1909

@inproceedings{Roy2017MalarialSE,
  title={Malarial Subjects: Empire, Medicine and Nonhumans in British India, 1820–1909},
  author={R. Roy},
  year={2017}
}
Malaria was considered one of the most widespread disease-causing entities in the nineteenth century. It was associated with a variety of frailties far beyond fevers, ranging from idiocy to impotence. And yet, it was not a self-contained category. The reconsolidation of malaria as a diagnostic category during this period happened within a wider context in which cinchona plants and their most valuable extract, quinine, were reinforced as objects of natural knowledge and social control. In India… Expand

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