Malaria's Many Mates: Past, Present, and Future of the Systematics of the Order Haemosporida

@inproceedings{Perkins2014MalariasMM,
  title={Malaria's Many Mates: Past, Present, and Future of the Systematics of the Order Haemosporida},
  author={Susan L. Perkins},
  booktitle={The Journal of parasitology},
  year={2014}
}
  • S. Perkins
  • Published in The Journal of parasitology 24 February 2014
  • Biology, Medicine
Abstract:  Malaria has been one of the most important diseases of humans throughout history and continues to be a major public health concern. The 5 species of Plasmodium that cause the disease in humans are part of the order Haemosporida, a diverse group of parasites that all have heteroxenous life cycles, alternating between a vertebrate host and a free-flying, blood-feeding dipteran vector. Traditionally, the identification and taxonomy of these parasites relied heavily on life-history… Expand

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