Making the Right Identification in the Turing Test1

@article{Traiger2004MakingTR,
  title={Making the Right Identification in the Turing Test1},
  author={Saul Traiger},
  journal={Minds and Machines},
  year={2004},
  volume={10},
  pages={561-572}
}
  • S. Traiger
  • Published 1 November 2000
  • Computer Science
  • Minds and Machines
The test Turing proposed for machine intelligence is usually understood to be a test of whether a computer can fool a human into thinking that the computer is a human. This standard interpretation is rejected in favor of a test based on the Imitation Game introduced by Turing at the beginning of "Computing Machinery and Intelligence." 

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