Making sense of young people's digital practices in informal contexts: The Digital Practice Framework

@article{Twining2021MakingSO,
  title={Making sense of young people's digital practices in informal contexts: The Digital Practice Framework},
  author={Peter Twining},
  journal={Br. J. Educ. Technol.},
  year={2021},
  volume={52},
  pages={461-481}
}
  • P. Twining
  • Published 28 September 2020
  • Computer Science, Sociology
  • Br. J. Educ. Technol.

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