Making sense of the voices.

@article{Lakeman2001MakingSO,
  title={Making sense of the voices.},
  author={Richard Lakeman},
  journal={International journal of nursing studies},
  year={2001},
  volume={38 5},
  pages={
          523-31
        }
}
  • R. Lakeman
  • Published 1 October 2001
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • International journal of nursing studies
Telling stories and hearing voices: narrative work with voice hearers in acute care.
TLDR
A project was developed to support staff on an acute inpatient ward to explore voice hearing with patients, and how the mental health nurse in acute care can realistically offer therapeutic interventions that may help a person towards recovery.
Voice hearing: a secondary analysis of talk by people who hear voices.
  • M. Jones, M. Coffey
  • Psychology, Medicine
    International journal of mental health nursing
  • 2012
TLDR
Data collected from a sample of people who hear voices is revisits with the aim of examining the explanatory devices deployed by individuals in their accounts of voice hearing, and it is suggested that this knowledge can inform a more thoughtful engagement with the experiences of voice Hearing by mental health nurses.
Listening to the Voices People Hear: Auditory Hallucinations Beyond a Diagnostic Framework
While voice hearing (auditory verbal hallucinations) is closely allied with psychosis/schizophrenia, it is well-established that the experience is reported by individuals with nonpsychotic diagnoses,
Emerging Perspectives From the Hearing Voices Movement: Implications for Research and Practice
TLDR
The historical growth and influence of the HVM is discussed, and it is suggested that the involvement of voice-hearers in research and a greater use of narrative and qualitative approaches are essential.
Living with voices: 50 stories of recovery
For over 25 years, the work of Marius Romme and Sandra Escher has inspired numerous academics, practitioners, voice hearers and their families, and brought together voice hearers and professionals
Listening to voice hearers
Summary This article considers what the Hearing Voices Network can offer to mental health social work. It combines an extensive literature review of voice hearing by Bob Sapey and the expertise by
The need for experience focused counselling (EFC) with voice hearers in training and practice: a review of the literature.
TLDR
This review focuses on the current evidence base for the individual approach of the Hearing Voices Movement, which is known as Experience Focused Counselling or Making Sense of Voices.
The Meaning of Voices in Understanding and Treating Psychosis: Moving Towards Intervention Informed by Collaborative Formulation
  • A. Lonergan
  • Psychology, Medicine
    Europe's journal of psychology
  • 2017
TLDR
Examination of the literature demonstrated the need for a paradigm shift to a recovery model, drawing on biopsychosocial factors in formulating an understanding of the meaning of voices in the context of a person's life to inform intervention.
Differences in voice-hearing experiences of people with psychosis in the U.S.A., India and Ghana: interview-based study.
TLDR
Observations suggest that the voice-hearing experiences of people with serious psychotic disorder are shaped by local culture, and these differences may have clinical implications.
Recovering from Hallucinations: A Qualitative Study of Coping with Voices Hearing of People with Schizophrenia in Hong Kong
TLDR
Results from qualitative interviews showed that people with schizophrenia in the Chinese sociocultural context of Hong Kong were coping with auditory hallucination in different ways, including changing social contacts, manipulating the voices, and changing perception and meaning towards the voices.
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