Making sense of it all: bacterial chemotaxis

@article{Wadhams2004MakingSO,
  title={Making sense of it all: bacterial chemotaxis},
  author={George H. Wadhams and Judith P. Armitage},
  journal={Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology},
  year={2004},
  volume={5},
  pages={1024-1037}
}
Bacteria must be able to respond to a changing environment, and one way to respond is to move. The transduction of sensory signals alters the concentration of small phosphorylated response regulators that bind to the rotary flagellar motor and cause switching. This simple pathway has provided a paradigm for sensory systems in general. However, the increasing number of sequenced bacterial genomes shows that although the central sensory mechanism seems to be common to all bacteria, there is added… Expand

Figures and Topics from this paper

Adaptation and control circuits in bacterial chemotaxis.
TLDR
The current understanding of the regulatory mechanisms in three species and how these pathways can be viewed and analysed through the ideas of feedback control systems engineering are summarized. Expand
Signal processing in complex chemotaxis pathways
TLDR
This article focuses on one of the best understood complex networks, which is found in Rhodobacter sphaeroides and integrates sensory data about the external environment and the metabolic state of the cell to produce a balanced response at the flagellar motor. Expand
Dynamics of Gradient Sensing and Chemotaxis
TLDR
A number of strategies used by cells that allow them to perform these various tasks successfully are reviewed. Expand
Engineering bacteria to recognize and follow small molecules.
TLDR
Synthetic biologists have begun to exploit the chemosensory pathways that control cell motility to reprogram how bacteria move in response to novel signals, potentially allowing consortia of cells to perform complex tasks. Expand
Going against the grain: chemotaxis and infection in Vibrio cholerae
TLDR
Investigating the role of the chemotactic control of rapid flagellar motility during V. cholerae infection has revealed some unexpected and intriguing results. Expand
Sensory Transduction in Bacteria
Bacterial signal transduction network is a complex array of numerous interacting components. It includes at least eight classes of sensor proteins that monitor various environmental and intracellularExpand
Diversity at its best: bacterial taxis.
TLDR
The physiological reasons for the majority of differences in the taxis systems are poorly understood and its elucidation represents a major research need. Expand
Chemotaxis-like regulatory systems: unique roles in diverse bacteria.
  • J. Kirby
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Annual review of microbiology
  • 2009
Bacteria sense the chemical world using a variety of mechanisms that include the frequently described two-component system (TCS), which comprises a sensor kinase and response regulator, to regulateExpand
Protein dynamics and mechanisms controlling the rotational behaviour of the bacterial flagellar motor.
TLDR
It has become clear that in addition to simply switching in response to chemosensory signals, the rotation of the bacterial flagellar motor can be slowed or stopped, using a clutch or a brake, by signals from metabolism and growth state. Expand
Bacterial Chemosensing
Bacteria have a continuous and urgent need to inform themselves about the chemistry of their surroundings. They must rapidly adjust their patterns of gene expression, their metabolic and transportExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 158 REFERENCES
Diversity in Chemotaxis Mechanisms among the Bacteria and Archaea
TLDR
The Bacillus subtilis chemotaxis system is considerably more complex and appears to be similar to the one that existed when the bacteria and archaea separated during evolution, so that understanding this mechanism should provide insight into the variety of mechanisms used today by the broad sweep of chemotactic bacteria and Archaea. Expand
Bacterial tactic responses.
  • J. Armitage
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Advances in microbial physiology
  • 1999
TLDR
The way in which bacteria use these systems to move to optimum environments and the interaction of the different sensory pathways to produce species-specific behavioural response will be the subject of this review. Expand
Transmembrane signaling by bacterial chemoreceptors: E. coli transducers with locked signal output
Methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) function as transmembrane signalers in bacteria. We isolated and characterized mutants of the E. coli Tsr protein that produce output signals in theExpand
Sensory adaptation in bacterial chemotaxis: regulation of demethylation
TLDR
Changes in methylesterase activity after the simultaneous addition of opposing stimuli through two different transducer classes suggest that the sensory information detected by these transducers was integrated and that this integrated signal controlled demethylation. Expand
Bacterial Chemosensing: Cooperative Molecular Logic
Bacterial chemotaxis is mediated by transmembrane receptors that bind attractant and repellent chemicals and control an intracellular protein kinase. Each cell contains thousands of receptor subunitsExpand
Chemical communication among bacteria
  • M. Taga, B. Bassler
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 2003
TLDR
Anti-quorumsensing strategies are present in both bacteria and eukaryotes, and these are apparently designed to combat bacteria that rely on cell–cell communication for the successful adaptation to particular niches. Expand
Receptor sensitivity in bacterial chemotaxis
  • V. Sourjik, H. Berg
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 2001
TLDR
Fluorescence resonance energy transfer is used to monitor interactions of CheY∼P with its phosphatase that reveal changes in the activity of the receptor kinase, CheA, resulting from the addition of attractants or repellents in Escherichia coli. Expand
How Signals Are Heard during Bacterial Chemotaxis: Protein-Protein Interactions in Sensory Signal Propagation
TLDR
The protein-protein interactions involved in chemotactic signaling, including interactions within the supramolecular complexes, interactions between the complexes and the messenger protein CheY, and interactions between CheY and the proteins that regulate its signaling state are reviewed. Expand
Bacterial chemotaxis: Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Sinorhizobium meliloti--variations on a theme?
TLDR
The presence of at least two CheY homologues and the finding that the swimming speed of these bacteria can vary, and, in the case of S. meliloti, vary with chemosensory stimulation, suggests a different control mechanism at the flagellar motor where speed can be altered, or the motor stopped, with a full delta p still present. Expand
Functional interactions between receptors in bacterial chemotaxis
TLDR
The results indicate that assemblies of bacterial chemoreceptors work in a highly cooperative manner, mimicking the behaviour of allosteric proteins, consistent with a number of models that assume long-range cooperative interactions between receptors as a general mechanism for signal integration and amplification. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...