Making sense of a prairie butterfly paradox: The effects of grazing, time since fire, and sampling period on regal fritillary abundance

@inproceedings{Moranz2014MakingSO,
  title={Making sense of a prairie butterfly paradox: The effects of grazing, time since fire, and sampling period on regal fritillary abundance},
  author={Raymond A. Moranz and Samuel D. Fuhlendorf and David M. Engle},
  year={2014}
}
Abstract Although grasslands often require periodic disturbance to prevent woody plant invasion, some grassland-obligate butterfly species respond negatively to disturbance agents such as fire and grazing. We examined the effects of time since fire, grazing and sampling period on abundance of a grassland-obligate butterfly, the regal fritillary (Speyeria idalia), at four grassland sites in Missouri, USA. Each site consisted of two pastures: one managed with patch-burn grazing (rotational… CONTINUE READING
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