Making music in a group: synchronization and shared experience.

@article{Overy2012MakingMI,
  title={Making music in a group: synchronization and shared experience.},
  author={Katie Overy},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={2012},
  volume={1252},
  pages={
          65-8
        }
}
To consider the full impact of musical learning on the brain, it is important to study the nature of everyday, non-expert forms of musical behavior alongside expert instrumental training. Such informal forms of music making tend to include social interaction, synchronization, body movements, and positive shared experiences. Here, I propose that when designing music intervention programs for scientific purposes, such features may have advantages over instrumental training, depending on the… CONTINUE READING
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