Making it Safer: A Health Centre’s Strategy for Suicide Prevention

@article{McAuliffe2007MakingIS,
  title={Making it Safer: A Health Centre’s Strategy for Suicide Prevention},
  author={Nora McAuliffe and L. Perry},
  journal={Psychiatric Quarterly},
  year={2007},
  volume={78},
  pages={295-307}
}
Developing and implementing consistent methodology for suicide assessment and intervention is challenging, particularly in a large community hospital which provides both inpatient care and a wide range of ambulatory and community based mental health programs. Patients, families, staff, and ongoing evaluation contributed to the development of an initiative to determine what is best practice and in effecting changes in clinical and organizational practices. The Suicide Assessment project resulted… Expand

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