Making inferences about the location of hidden food: social dog, causal ape.

@article{Bruer2006MakingIA,
  title={Making inferences about the location of hidden food: social dog, causal ape.},
  author={Juliane Br{\"a}uer and Juliane Kaminski and Julia Riedel and Josep Call and Michael Tomasello},
  journal={Journal of comparative psychology},
  year={2006},
  volume={120 1},
  pages={
          38-47
        }
}
Domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) and great apes from the genus Pan were tested on a series of object choice tasks. In each task, the location of hidden food was indicated for subjects by some kind of communicative, behavioral, or physical cue. On the basis of differences in the ecologies of these 2 genera, as well as on previous research, the authors hypothesized that dogs should be especially skillful in using human communicative cues such as the pointing gesture, whereas apes should be… 
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In recent years evidence has accumulated demonstrating that dogs are, to a degree, skilful in using human forms of communication, making them stand out in the animal kingdom. Neither man's closest
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