Magnetodendrimers allow endosomal magnetic labeling and in vivo tracking of stem cells

@article{Bulte2001MagnetodendrimersAE,
  title={Magnetodendrimers allow endosomal magnetic labeling and in vivo tracking of stem cells},
  author={Jeff W. M. Bulte and Trevor Douglas and Brian P. Witwer and Su-Chun Zhang and Erica Strable and Bobbi K. Lewis and Holly A. Zywicke and Bradley R Miller and Peter van Gelderen and Bruce M. Moskowitz and Ian D. Duncan and Joseph A. Frank},
  journal={Nature Biotechnology},
  year={2001},
  volume={19},
  pages={1141-1147}
}
Magnetic resonance (MR) tracking of magnetically labeled stem and progenitor cells is an emerging technology, leading to an urgent need for magnetic probes that can make cells highly magnetic during their normal expansion in culture. We have developed magnetodendrimers as a versatile class of magnetic tags that can efficiently label mammalian cells, including human neural stem cells (NSCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), through a nonspecific membrane adsorption process with subsequent… 
Highly efficient endosomal labeling of progenitor and stem cells with large magnetic particles allows magnetic resonance imaging of single cells.
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It is shown that HVJ-E is a more efficient vehicle of cell transfection using quantitative evaluation and that the iron content per cell can be predicted using a simple, automated image analysis of stained, labeled cells.
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Though a careful titration of SPION incorporation, cellular function and MRI visualization is essential, Citrate SPIONs are very efficient intracellular magnetic labels for in vivo stem cell tracking by MRI.
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