Magnetic resonance imaging of abnormal shoulder pain following influenza vaccination

@article{Okur2014MagneticRI,
  title={Magnetic resonance imaging of abnormal shoulder pain following influenza vaccination},
  author={Gokcan Okur and Kimberly A. Chaney and Laurie McAdams Lomasney},
  journal={Skeletal Radiology},
  year={2014},
  volume={43},
  pages={1325-1331}
}
The influenza vaccine is increasingly available to the general public and mandated by many employers in the United States. [] Key Result An intrasubstance fluid-like signal in deep muscular and/or tendinous structures was the most common finding on MRI of these four cases. Focal bone marrow signal within the humeral head and inflammatory changes in the subacromial/subdeltoid bursa were also observed.

Shoulder Injury Related to Vaccine Administration (SIRVA): An Occupational Case Report

Occupationally related SIRVA is a preventable adverse event that should be considered in workplace vaccine administration programs, and appropriate education and training provided to vaccine administrators to address this.

Persistent Shoulder Pain After Vaccine Administration Is Associated with Common Incidental Pathology: A Systematic Review

The observation that persistent shoulder pain after vaccination overlaps with common shoulder pathology—both in large databases as well as in more detailed reports of specific patients as analyzed in this review—establishes a high probability of a coincidental rather than a causal association.

Shoulder Injury Related to Vaccine Administration

Background: Shoulder injury related to vaccine administration (SIRVA) is a recognized complication and possible source of morbidity associated with incorrectly administered intramuscular deltoid

Shoulder injury related to SARS-CoV-2 vaccine administration

A 62-year-old woman with a history of hypertension, dyslipidemia and neck pain, without a preceding history of shoulder pain, received her first dose of the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine without complications.

What Do We Know About Shoulder Injury Related to Vaccine Administration? An Updated Systematic Review

The association between inflammatory conditions of the shoulder (such as bursitis) and vaccination appears to be exceedingly rare, occurring after approximately 1:130,000 vaccination events according to the best-available comparative study.

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 15 REFERENCES

Progressive osteolysis and surface chondrolysis of the proximal humerus following influenza vaccination.

The case of a 46-year-old man who experienced progressive osteolysis and surface chondrolysis of the proximal humerus following routine influenza vaccination, the first reported complication of influenza vaccination requiring surgical intervention is described.

A “Needling” Problem: Shoulder Injury Related to Vaccine Administration

This case serves as a catalyst for discussion regarding vaccination technique and the potential to prevent complications arising from vaccine overpenetration.

Needle Length for Immunization of Early Adolescents as Determined by Ultrasound

For intramuscular immunization of early adolescents, a 16-mm needle is appropriate for those weighing <60 kg, and a 25-mm needles are appropriate for Those weighing 60 to 70 kg, using either technique.

Atraumatic osteonecrosis of the humeral head.

A low incidence of humeral head involvement in the osteonecrosis patient cohort, and a high incidence of corticosteroid use, hip involvement, and bilateral disease are observed.

Subacromial anatomy for the arthroscopist.

  • L. MatthewsP. Fadale
  • Medicine
    Arthroscopy : the journal of arthroscopic & related surgery : official publication of the Arthroscopy Association of North America and the International Arthroscopy Association
  • 1989

Determination of deltoid fat pad thickness. Implications for needle length in adult immunization.

Among healthy adults of the age range the authors studied, the following needle lengths appear to be appropriate for true deltoid intramuscular immunization: for men across the weight ranges they studied (59-118 kg), use of a 25-mm (1-in) needle would result in at least 5 mm of muscle penetration in all subjects.

Useful boundaries of the subacromial bursa.

  • T. BealsD. T. HarrymanM. Lazarus
  • Medicine
    Arthroscopy : the journal of arthroscopic & related surgery : official publication of the Arthroscopy Association of North America and the International Arthroscopy Association
  • 1998

Institute of Medicine (IOM) Report generated Proposals for Updates to the Vaccine Injury Table (VIT)

  • Skeletal Radiol
  • 2011