Magnetic Properties Experiments on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit at Gusev Crater

@article{Bertelsen2004MagneticPE,
  title={Magnetic Properties Experiments on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit at Gusev Crater},
  author={Preben Bertelsen and W. Goetz and Morten Bo Madsen and Kjartan M. Kinch and S F Hviid and Jens Martin Knudsen and Haraldur P Gunnlaugsson and Jonathan P. Merrison and Per N{\o}rnberg and Steven W. Squyres and James F. Bell and Kenneth E. Herkenhoff and Stephen Gorevan and Albert S. Yen and T. Myrick and G{\"o}star Klingelh{\"o}fer and Rudolf Rieder and Ralf Gellert},
  journal={Science},
  year={2004},
  volume={305},
  pages={827 - 829}
}
The magnetic properties experiments are designed to help identify the magnetic minerals in the dust and rocks on Mars—and to determine whether liquid water was involved in the formation and alteration of these magnetic minerals. Almost all of the dust particles suspended in the martian atmosphere must contain ferrimagnetic minerals (such as maghemite or magnetite) in an amount of ∼2% by weight. The most magnetic fraction of the dust appears darker than the average dust. Magnetite was detected… 

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