Magic at the marketplace: Choice blindness for the taste of jam and the smell of tea

@article{Hall2010MagicAT,
  title={Magic at the marketplace: Choice blindness for the taste of jam and the smell of tea},
  author={Lars Hall and Petter Johansson and Betty T{\"a}rning and Sverker Sikstr{\"o}m and Th{\'e}r{\`e}se Deutgen},
  journal={Cognition},
  year={2010},
  volume={117},
  pages={54-61}
}

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