Maggot therapy: a review of the therapeutic applications of fly larvae in human medicine, especially for treating osteomyelitis

@article{Sherman1988MaggotTA,
  title={Maggot therapy: a review of the therapeutic applications of fly larvae in human medicine, especially for treating osteomyelitis},
  author={Ronald A Sherman and Edward A. Pechter},
  journal={Medical and Veterinary Entomology},
  year={1988},
  volume={2}
}
ABSTRACT. In traditional medical practice, the larvae of some Diptera: Calliphoridae, notably Lucilia illustris (Meigen), L. sericata (Meigen) and Phormia regina (Meigen), have been employed for maggot therapy, i.e. to help clean lesions antiseptically, especially for treatment of chronic osteomyelitis. This mode of treatment remains appropriate for cases where antibiotics are ineffective and surgery impracticable. 
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