Madhouse: A Tragic Tale of Megalomania and Modern Medicine

@inproceedings{Scull2005MadhouseAT,
  title={Madhouse: A Tragic Tale of Megalomania and Modern Medicine},
  author={Andrew Scull},
  year={2005}
}
Madhouse reveals a long-suppressed medical scandal, shocking in its brutality and sobering in its implications. It shows how a leading American psychiatrist of the early twentieth century came to believe that mental illnesses were a purely biological phenomenon, the product of chronic infections that poisoned the brain. Convinced that he had uncovered the single source of psychosis, Henry Cotton, superintendent of the Trenton State Hospital, New Jersey, launched a ruthless campaign to… Expand
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