Mad Honey Poisoning in Man and Rat

@article{Onat1991MadHP,
  title={Mad Honey Poisoning in Man and Rat},
  author={Filiz Onat and Berrak Ç. Yeğen and Roger Lawrence and Ahmet Afşin Oktay and S. Oklay},
  journal={Reviews on Environmental Health},
  year={1991},
  volume={9},
  pages={10 - 3}
}
Grayanotoxins are known to occur in the honey produced from the nectar of Rhododendron ponticum growing on the mountains of the eastern Black Sea region of Turkey and also in Japan, Nepal, Brazil, and some parts of North America and Europe. Two cases of honey intoxication are presented here. Both of the patients experienced severe bradycardia and hypotension after ingestion of honey which was brought from Trabzon, Turkey. Microscopical examination showed Rhododendron ponticum pollen tetrades… Expand
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  • 2007
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Mad honey poisoning in man and rat
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