Corpus ID: 142143577

Machines without Principals: Liability Rules and Artificial Intelligence

@article{Vladeck2014MachinesWP,
  title={Machines without Principals: Liability Rules and Artificial Intelligence},
  author={David C. Vladeck},
  journal={Washington Law Review},
  year={2014},
  volume={89},
  pages={117}
}
  • D. Vladeck
  • Published 1 March 2014
  • Sociology
  • Washington Law Review
INTRODUCTIONThe idea that humans could, at some point, develop machines that actually "think" for themselves and act autonomously has been embedded in our literature and culture since the beginning of civilization.1 But these ideas were generally thought to be religious expressions-what one scholar describes as an effort to forge our own Gods2-or pure science fiction. There was one important thread that tied together these visions of a special breed of superhuman men/machines: They invariably… 
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