MY THEROPOD IS BIGGER THAN YOURS … OR NOT: ESTIMATING BODY SIZE FROM SKULL LENGTH IN THEROPODS

@inproceedings{Therrien2007MYTI,
  title={MY THEROPOD IS BIGGER THAN YOURS … OR NOT: ESTIMATING BODY SIZE FROM SKULL LENGTH IN THEROPODS},
  author={François Therrien and Donald M. Henderson},
  year={2007}
}
Abstract To develop a widely applicable method to estimate body size in theropods, the scaling relationship between skull length, body length, and body mass was investigated using 13 strictly carnivorous, non-avialan theropod taxa ranging in size from the 1-m Sinosauropteryx prima to the 12-m Tyrannosaurus rex. Body length was obtained from the literature for complete to nearly-complete specimens and body mass was obtained from three-dimensional mathematical slicing of those same specimens to… 
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