MUSEUM SPECIMENS AND PHYLOGENIES ELUCIDATE ECOLOGY'S ROLE IN COEVOLUTIONARY ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN MITES AND THEIR BEE HOSTS

@inproceedings{Klimov2007MUSEUMSA,
  title={MUSEUM SPECIMENS AND PHYLOGENIES ELUCIDATE ECOLOGY'S ROLE IN COEVOLUTIONARY ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN MITES AND THEIR BEE HOSTS},
  author={P. Klimov and B. O’connor and L. Knowles},
  booktitle={Evolution; international journal of organic evolution},
  year={2007}
}
Abstract Coevolutionary associations between hosts and symbionts (or parasites) are often reflected in correlated patterns of divergence as a consequence of limitations on dispersal and establishment on new hosts. Here we show that a phylogenetic correlation is observed between chaetodactylid mites and their hosts, the long-tongued bees; however, this association manifests itself in an atypical fashion. Recently derived mites tend to be associated with basal bee lineages, and vice versa, ruling… Expand
Ancient host shifts followed by host conservatism in a group of ant parasitoids
TLDR
This work presents the most comprehensive molecular phylogeny of Eucharitidae to date, including 44 of the 53 genera and fossil-calibrated estimates of divergence dates, and finds that their evolutionary histories are more similar than expected at random. Expand
Redundant species, cryptic host-associated divergence, and secondary shift in Sennertia mites (Acari: Chaetodactylidae) associated with four large carpenter bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Xylocopa) in the Japanese island arc.
TLDR
The results indicate that some mites have undergone secondary host switch after the formation of the four mite lineages and further experienced mitochondrial introgression during period of lineage coexistence, providing a unique source of evidence for migration and competitive exclusion between the presently allopatric Xylocopa hosts. Expand
Cospeciation vs host-shift speciation: methods for testing, evidence from natural associations and relation to coevolution.
TLDR
Overall, there is now substantial evidence to suggest that coevolutionary dynamics of hosts and parasites do not favor long-term cospeciation, and approaches to compare divergence between pairwise associated groups of species, their advantages and pitfalls are outlined. Expand
Phylogeny and coevolutionary associations of makialgine mites (Acari, Psoroptidae, Makialginae) provide insight into evolutionary history of their hosts, strepsirrhine primates
TLDR
The data suggest that extant associations between Malagasy lemurs and their mites resulted from a single ancient codispersal to Madagascar from Africa, and indirectly support the hypothesis of the monophyletic origin of the infraorder Lemuriformes, the superfamily Lemuroidea, and the sister-group relationships between the families Lemuridae and Indriidae. Expand
Detecting ancient codispersals and host shifts by double dating of host and parasite phylogenies: Application in proctophyllodid feather mites associated with passerine birds
TLDR
This framework offers a more robust detection of host and symbiont cophylogeographic events (as compared to host‐symbiont reconciliation analysis and using host phylogeography for time‐calibration) and provides independent data for testing alternative hypotheses on timing of host diversification and dispersal. Expand
Cophylogenetic analyses reveal extensive host-shift speciation in a highly specialized and host-specific symbiont system.
TLDR
It is concluded that host-shift speciation, rather than cospeciation, may be the main driver of symbiont diversification even for highly specialized symbionts with low host-switching potential. Expand
Patterns of co-speciation and host switching in primate malaria parasites
TLDR
The evolution of primate malarias is constrained by the phylogenetic associations of their hosts, and the emergence of new malaria disease in primates including humans cannot be predicted from the phylogeny of parasites. Expand
Morphology, Evolution, and Host Associations of Bee-Associated Mites of the Family Chaetodactylidae (Acari: Astigmata) with a monographic revision of North American taxa
TLDR
The hypothesis of a post-Gondwanan origin of chaetodactylids, prior to the late Eocene, is supported and metasomal acarinaria (special pouches for mite transfer) in some Neotropical Ceratina and Tetrapedia is described. Expand
Ancestral Area Analysis of Chaetodactylid Mites (Acari: Chaetodactylidae), with Description of a New Early Derivative Genus and Six New Species from the Neotropics
TLDR
Present distribution and host associations of chaetodactylids can be best explained by host shifts and intercontinental dispersals of phylogenetically basal groups, and six new early derivative taxa from the Neotropics are described, including the newly described early derivative genus Centriacarus. Expand
Regional collapse of symbiotic specificity between lucanid beetles and canestriniid mites
TLDR
It is suggested that host-specific canestriniids provide benefits to hosts that do not develop countermeasures to exclude micro- or macroparasites from their surfaces, and false host specificity in the canestRiniids has been maintained by habitat isolation and/or aggressive behaviour toward competitors. Expand
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 89 REFERENCES
Biogeography explains cophylogenetic patterns in toucan chewing lice.
TLDR
Recon reconstructions of host and louse phylogenies indicate that they do not branch in parallel, and their cophylogenetic history shows little or no significant cospeciation, suggesting that for some louse lineages biogeography may be more important than host associations in structuring louse populations and species, particularly when host life history or parasite life history might promote frequent host switching events between syntopic host species. Expand
Coevolution: a history of the macroevolutionary approach to studying host-parasite associations.
  • G. Klassen
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The Journal of parasitology
  • 1992
TLDR
The year 1991 marked 100 yr of coevolution research, with Brooks melding this new phylogenetic method (cladistics) with an equally new biogeographic method (vicariance biogeography), providing the foundations for the modern macroevolutionary approach to studying host-parasite associations. Expand
LINKING COEVOLUTIONARY HISTORY TO ECOLOGICAL PROCESS: DOVES AND LICE
TLDR
It is found that dove body lice show strong evidence of cospeciation whereas dove wing lice do not, and differences in their dispersal ability may underlie these joint differences in host specificity, population genetic structure, and coevolutionary history. Expand
Ecology of congruence: past meets present.
TLDR
Careful comparison of chewing lice genera suggests that dispersal is a more fundamental barrier to host switching among related hosts than is establishment, and there is a correspondence between important ecological factors and the degree of phylogenetic congruence. Expand
When do parasites fail to speciate in response to host speciation?
TLDR
This work reconstructed trees from mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences for pigeons and doves and their feather lice and identified three apparent cases where the host has speciated but the associated parasite has not. Expand
CODIVERSIFICATION IN AN ANT‐PLANT MUTUALISM: STEM TEXTURE AND THE EVOLUTION OF HOST USE IN CREMATOGASTER (FORMICIDAE: MYRMICINAE) INHABITANTS OF MACARANGA (EUPHORBIACEAE)
TLDR
The inferred timeline based on cytochrome oxidase I divergence rates concurs with independent biogeographical events in the region reconstructed from palynological data, thus suggesting that the evolutionary histories of Decacrema and their Pachystemon hosts have been contemporaneous since the mid‐Miocene. Expand
Evolutionary relationships, cospeciation, and host switching in avian malaria parasites.
TLDR
Global assessments of the relationship between parasite and host phylogenetic trees, using Component and ParaFit, failed to detect significant cospeciation, suggesting parasite speciation may happen more often in conjunction with the acquisition of new hosts followed by divergent selection between host lineages in sympatry. Expand
Host-symbiont stability and fast evolutionary rates in an ant-bacterium association: cospeciation of camponotus species and their endosymbionts, candidatus blochmannia.
TLDR
Phylogenetic congruence among Blochmannia genes indicates genome stability that typifies primary endosymbionts of insects, indicating that Blochmania-Camponotus symbiosis has been evolutionarily stable throughout tens of millions of years. Expand
Mites: Ecological and Evolutionary Analyses of Life-History Patterns
TLDR
This book discusses the evolution of parasitism and the distribution of some dermanyssoid mites (mesostigmata) on vertebrate hosts, and life-history patterns of mites associated with bees. Expand
Cophylogenetic relationships between penguins and their chewing lice
TLDR
Despite the paucity of cospeciation, there is support for significant congruence between the louse and penguin phylogenies due to possible failure to speciate events (parasites not speciating in response to their hosts speciating). Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...