MULTIPLE ORIGINS OF EUSOCIALITY AMONG SPONGE‐DWELLING SHRIMPS (SYNALPHEUS)

@article{Duffy2000MULTIPLEOO,
  title={MULTIPLE ORIGINS OF EUSOCIALITY AMONG SPONGE‐DWELLING SHRIMPS (SYNALPHEUS)},
  author={J. Emmett Duffy and Cheryl L. Morrison and Rub{\'e}n Rios},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={2000},
  volume={54}
}
Abstract.— As the most extreme expression of apparent altruism in nature, eusociality has long posed a central paradox for behavioral and evolutionary ecology. Because eusociality has arisen rarely among animals, understanding the selective pressures important in early stages of its evolution remains elusive. Employing a historical approach to this problem, we used morphology and DNA sequences to reconstruct the phylogeny of 13 species of sponge‐dwelling shrimps (Synalpheus) with colony… 
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The data suggest that the highly diverse sponge-dwelling shrimp assemblage of the Belize Barrier Reef is structured by competition, and that eusociality has allowed a small number of species to dominate the sponge resource.
Phylogenetic community ecology and the role of social dominance in sponge-dwelling shrimp.
TLDR
It is demonstrated that sponge-dwelling shrimp (Synalpheus) assemblages are structured by size-based habitat filtering, interacting with competitive exclusion mediated by social system, and that community assembly in this diverse system occurs via traits mediating niche use and differential competitive ability.
Allometry of individual reproduction and defense in eusocial colonies: A comparative approach to trade-offs in social sponge-dwelling Synalpheus shrimps
TLDR
These results suggest that in less cooperative species, intra-colony conflict selects for queen retention of weapons that have significant costs to fecundity, while reproducing females from highly eusocial species, i.e., those with a single queen, have been able to reduce the cost of weapons as a result of protection by other colony members.
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