MR imaging and biomedical implants, materials, and devices: an updated review.

@article{Shellock1991MRIA,
  title={MR imaging and biomedical implants, materials, and devices: an updated review.},
  author={Frank G. Shellock and J S Curtis},
  journal={Radiology},
  year={1991},
  volume={180 2},
  pages={
          541-50
        }
}
Certain ferromagnetic metallic implants, materials, and devices are regarded as contraindications for magnetic resonance imaging, primarily because of the risks associated with their movement or dislodgment. More than 40 publications have reported the ferromagnetic qualities of 261 different metallic objects (aneurysm and hemostatic clips, 32; carotid artery vascular clamps, five; dental devices or materials, 16; heart valve prostheses, 29; intravascular coils, filters, and stents, 14; ocular… Expand
Ex vivo evaluation of ferromagnetism and artifacts of cardiac occluders exposed to a 1.5‐T MR system
TLDR
It is concluded that patients with ferromagnetic cardiac occluders may undergo MR procedures approximately 6 weeks after placement of these devices, to allow tissue growth to provide additional retentive force. Expand
Mr Imaging in the Presence of Small Circular Metallic Implants
TLDR
No evidence of thermal injury was found in the area of the titanium rings, suggesting that the presence of the rings does not contraindicate MR examinations, and slight inflammatory changes apparently caused by the operation were revealed. Expand
MR imaging and metallic implants for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: Assessment of ferromagnetism and artifact
TLDR
Alternative nonferromagnetic implants should be considered for reconstruction of the ACL because images of the knee of one patient with two Perfix screws in place were not interpretable because of the image distortion caused by these implants. Expand
A quick guide to safety and compatibility of passive implants and devices in an MR environment
TLDR
A device is MR-safe when it is used in the MR environment, but presents no additional risk to the patient or other individuals, although the quality of diagnostic information may be affected, as well as the possible retaining mechanisms. Expand
Safety of Patients with Medical Devices during Application of Magnetic Resonance Methods
TLDR
The purpose of this report is to provide a review of the implanted or attached medical devices that may be associated with morbidity or even mortality in patients undergoing magnetic resonance imaging procedures. Expand
Behavior of metal implants used in ENT surgery in 7 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging
TLDR
There was a tendency for the pure gold implants to move less in the 7 Tesla MRI than all other tested materials, and general statements cannot be made about the MRI suitability of different implants. Expand
Magnetic resonance imaging artifacts and the magnetic attachment system.
  • F. Iimuro
  • Materials Science, Medicine
  • Dental materials journal
  • 1994
The use of a rare earth magnetic attachment system as a means of retaining dentures or maxillofacial prostheses results in artifacts, when magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used as a diagnosticExpand
Magnetic resonance imaging and cochlear implants: Compatibility and safety aspects
TLDR
It was shown that most of the electromagneticerences between the cochlear implant and the 1.5 T scanner remained within acceptable limits, and therefore MRI examination should only be performed if there is a strong medical indication. Expand
Biomechanical Influences of Magnetic Resonance Imaging on the SOUNDTEC Direct System Implant
TLDR
Physical and mechanical testing of the SOUNDTEC implant indicates that the structural integrity of the ossicles will be maintained during 0.3-T MRI of the human head. Expand
The value of published data on MR compatibility of metallic implants and devices.
TLDR
Determining why MR compatibility data exist and what their actual limitations may be are the major objectives of this report. Expand
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TLDR
Patients with these particular metallic implants or materials can be examined safely by MR imaging with scanners having static magnetic field strengths up to and including those used for the specific evaluations. Expand
High-field-strength MR imaging and metallic biomedical implants: an ex vivo evaluation of deflection forces.
TLDR
Thirty-two of 36 metallic biomedical implants tested can be safely imaged with high-field-strength MR systems, and only four aneurysm clips had sufficient ferromagnetism to warrant exclusion of patients with these implants from imaging with a 1.5-T MR system. Expand
MR imaging in patients with metallic implants.
TLDR
Only two patients reported discomfort that could possibly have been related to their metallic implants, but in both cases it seemed unlikely that the symptoms were actually related to the imaging process, and there were no apparent short-term adverse effects demonstrated in these patients. Expand
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TLDR
The risks to patients with metal surgical implants who are undergoing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging and the artifacts caused by such implants were studied and induced ferromagnetism was shown to be related to the composition of the alloys from which the clips were manufactured. Expand
MR imaging artifacts, ferromagnetism, and magnetic torque of intravascular filters, stents, and coils.
TLDR
Experiments were conducted in which various intravascular filters, stents, and coils were imaged using magnetic resonance (MR) spin-echo technique at 0.35 T, finding Beta-3 titanium alloy is apparently one of the best-suited metals for use with MR imaging because of its lack of ferromagnetism. Expand
The Effect of Magnetic Resonance Imaging on Metal Spine Implants
TLDR
It is concluded that patients with spine implants may safely undergo magnetic resonance scanning and plane of scan was found to be the most significant parameter in achieving useful studies, with the sagittal plane being the preferred orientation. Expand
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TLDR
This study supports the continued widespread use of small metallic hemostatic clips in the myriad of procedures in which they are presently used and illustrates the need for methods of evaluating such devices before they are clinically implanted. Expand
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TLDR
Intraocular lenses with a platinum clip, or metallic or plastic loops, and 5 X 0/6 X 0 steelwire used as suturing material experienced no magnetic movement or change of position in the strong magnetic field. Expand
Interaction of metallic neurosurgical implants with magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 Tesla as a cause of image distortion and of hazardous movement of the implant
TLDR
It is advisable to refrain from magnetic resonance imaging in patients harbouring intracranial aneurysm clips, as the movement in the magnetic field may be hazardous. Expand
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TLDR
The effect of MRI scanning on two types of retinal tacks currently in use are studied, including a cobalt-nickel tack that has been approved for surgical implantation and an alloy containing 45% cobalt and 23% nickel by weight. Expand
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