MOSHER AWARD HONORABLE MENTION

@article{Rosenberg2000MOSHERAH,
  title={MOSHER AWARD HONORABLE MENTION},
  author={Seth I. Rosenberg},
  journal={The Laryngoscope},
  year={2000},
  volume={110}
}
Objectives/Hypothesis 1) Develop a computerized technique to accurately compare acoustic neuroma size on routine computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans; 2) use this technique to determine the growth pattern in a large series of patients with acoustic neuroma who were conservatively managed; 3) describe the natural history of patients with acoustic neuromas who did not receive surgical intervention and those who underwent subtotal resection; 4) correlate the size and… 
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TLDR
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TLDR
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