MORPHOLOGICAL DIVERGENCE OF BREEDERS AND HELPERS IN WILD DAMARALAND MOLE‐RAT SOCIETIES

@article{Young2010MORPHOLOGICALDO,
  title={MORPHOLOGICAL DIVERGENCE OF BREEDERS AND HELPERS IN WILD DAMARALAND MOLE‐RAT SOCIETIES},
  author={Andrew J. Young and Nigel Charles Bennett},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={2010},
  volume={64}
}
The specialization of body shape to an individual's role within society represents a pinnacle of social evolution. Although commonplace among social insects, divergence in the body shapes of breeders and helpers has to date been documented in just one social vertebrate, the naked mole‐rat, Heterocephalus glaber; an extraordinary species in which large colony size and frequent inbreeding may have favored the evolution of such specialization. Here, we present new evidence of morphological… 
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    Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
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The results show that, as in eusocial insects, reproductive division of labor in mole-rats leads to gene regulatory rewiring and extensive morphological plasticity, however, in Mole-rats, concentrated reproduction is also accompanied by costs to bone strength.
Complete reproductive skew within white-browed sparrow weaver groups despite outbreeding opportunities for subordinates of both sexes
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