MONET Special Issue on Next Generation Hardware Architectures for Secure Mobile Computing

@article{Sklavos2007MONETSI,
  title={MONET Special Issue on Next Generation Hardware Architectures for Secure Mobile Computing},
  author={Nicolas Sklavos and M{\'a}ire O’Neill and Xinmiao Zhang},
  journal={Mobile Networks and Applications},
  year={2007},
  volume={12},
  pages={229-230}
}
Security is of paramount importance to the design of modern communication systems and in particular, to wireless networks. Wireless devices are becoming commonplace in both the office and home environment and therefore, the need for strong secure transport protocols is one of the most important issues in mobile standards. Cryptography is the foremost method for providing communication security and is a mathematically intensive process which, to date, has mainly been implemented in software… 

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