MICROLENSING EVENTS OF THE LMC ARE BETTER EXPLAINED BY STARS WITHIN THE LMC THAN BY MACHOS

@article{Sahu1994MICROLENSINGEO,
  title={MICROLENSING EVENTS OF THE LMC ARE BETTER EXPLAINED BY STARS WITHIN THE LMC THAN BY MACHOS},
  author={Kailash C. Sahu},
  journal={Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific},
  year={1994},
  volume={106},
  pages={942}
}
  • K. Sahu
  • Published 1 May 1994
  • Physics
  • Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific
For observations within the bar of the LMC, the probability of microlensing being caused by a star within the LMC is found to be ~5 x 10-8. Outside of the bar, the probability of microlensing being caused by a star in the LMC is 4 to 12 times lower. The event detected by Alock et al. and one of the events detected by Aubourg et al. lie well within the bar for which probability of microlensing is consistent with being caused by an object within the LMC. It is further shown that, under certain… 

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