MHC polymorphism under host-pathogen coevolution

@article{Borghans2003MHCPU,
  title={MHC polymorphism under host-pathogen coevolution},
  author={Jos{\'e} A. M. Borghans and Joost B. Beltman and Rob J. De Boer},
  journal={Immunogenetics},
  year={2003},
  volume={55},
  pages={732-739}
}
The genes encoding major histocompatibility (MHC) molecules are among the most polymorphic genes known for vertebrates. Since MHC molecules play an important role in the induction of immune responses, the evolution of MHC polymorphism is often explained in terms of increased protection of hosts against pathogens. Two selective pressures that are thought to be involved are (1) selection favoring MHC heterozygous hosts, and (2) selection for rare MHC alleles by host-pathogen coevolution. We have… 

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