MHC-associated mating strategies and the importance of overall genetic diversity in an obligate pair-living primate

@article{Schwensow2007MHCassociatedMS,
  title={MHC-associated mating strategies and the importance of overall genetic diversity in an obligate pair-living primate},
  author={Nina I Schwensow and Joanna Fietz and Kathrin H. Dausmann and Simone Sommer},
  journal={Evolutionary Ecology},
  year={2007},
  volume={22},
  pages={617-636}
}
Mate choice is one of the most important evolutionary mechanisms. Females can improve their fitness by selectively mating with certain males. We studied possible genetic benefits in the obligate pair-living fat-tailed dwarf lemur (Cheirogaleus medius) which maintains life-long pair bonds but has an extremely high rate of extra-pair paternity. Possible mechanisms of female mate choice were investigated by analyzing overall genetic variability (neutral microsatellite marker) as well as a marker… Expand

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