MHC Class I Peptides as Chemosensory Signals in the Vomeronasal Organ

@article{LeindersZufall2004MHCCI,
  title={MHC Class I Peptides as Chemosensory Signals in the Vomeronasal Organ},
  author={Trese Leinders-Zufall and Peter A. Brennan and Patricia Widmayer and Prashanth Chandramani S and Andrea Maul-Pavicic and Martina J{\"a}ger and Xiao-hong Li and Heinz Breer and Frank Zufall and Thomas Boehm},
  journal={Science},
  year={2004},
  volume={306},
  pages={1033 - 1037}
}
The mammalian vomeronasal organ detects social information about gender, status, and individuality. The molecular cues carrying this information remain largely unknown. Here, we show that small peptides that serve as ligands for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules function also as sensory stimuli for a subset of vomeronasal sensory neurons located in the basal Gao- and V2R receptor–expressing zone of the vomeronasal epithelium. In behaving mice, the same peptides function… Expand
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